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August Wilson Center - Front & Center » African American culture - “Amplifying African American Voices”

Posts Tagged ‘African American culture’

The Legendary, the Late Phyllis Hyman - August Wilson Center’s Tribute

Posted in Events, General, Review on February 18th, 2010 by Shaunda – Be the first to comment


Sensuous and sassy. Bold and brilliant. Earthy and ethereal.Phyllis Hyman

Phyllis Hyman was all these things and more.

As a singer she was nearly unmatched in her ability to convey the depths of the pain and heartache of lost love. Phyllis, Philly-born and Pittsburgh-raised, could tackle pop and jazz standards as well as up-tempo R&B with equal aplomb. Yet it was the vulnerability of her ballads that most endeared her to fans, who took the journey with her to those lonely, dark places of which she sang.

The August Wilson Center is paying tribute to the late singer Friday, February 19 and Saturday, February 20 by producing a full concert of Phyllis Hyman tunes: 16 songs, 7 voices selected from an open audition and a 7-piece band led by the awesome Alton Merrell. Friday’s show sold out in just a couple of weeks–here’s a tip:

Get your tickets now for Saturday’s show!

Shay Wafer, the Center’s Vice President of Programs, and director for this event, took a few moments to talk with KQV’s Elaine Effort about the Tribute to Phyllis Hyman.

The interview is in three parts. Take a look!

Also–Don’t miss out on this free educational event!

African American Mental Health Forum
Saturday, February 20, 2 to 4 pm
August Wilson Center Education Center, Free

African Americans are at high risk for mental illness, but less likely to receive mental health services, diagnosis and treatment, says a 2002 Surgeon General’s report. This panel discussion explores the history of mental health issues in the African American community and provides steps you can take to assist others in their well-being. Panelists include: Dr. Charma Dudley, Clinical Director - Family Resources, Dr. Daniel Hall, Dr. Nelson Harris, Jeannie Hyman (sister of Phyllis Hyman) and Marguerita Matthew. For information, call 412.258.2700.

Contract Resistance: Hip-Hop, Soul & More

Posted in Events, General on October 20th, 2009 by Shaunda – Be the first to comment

hiphopeblast2

It’s all going down this Friday — don’t miss out on how the August Wilson Center does hip-hop, soul and more!
The beats are tight and the grooves smooth as the August Wilson Center, the Shadow Lounge and Urban Kontent Brand present an evening of hip-hop and soul collective performances featuring hip-hop artists Formula412, J-San & The Analogue Sons, Chen-Lo, D.C.’s own W. Ellington Felton, Common Wealth Family, Kellee Maize, DJ Selecta will provide the house music and Yah Lioness & Gene Stovall will host the evening.

Free After Party* @ Shadow Lounge featuring J-San & the Analogue Sons and Man in the Street…Plus DJ Vex spinning in AVA til 2 am! Show your ticket stub at the door.

TICKETS: $15 —–> PURCHASE NOW

BUT THAT’S NOT ALL….

State of Hip-Hop Forum

Friday, October 23, 6 pm
Free

Explore the economic, social, political and musical influences of hip-hop, both in the United States and around the world, at this special “town hall” discussion featuring a panel of hip-hop artists, including Paradise Gray, Dr. Kimberly C. Ellis (aka Dr. Goddess), DJ Boogie, DJ Omar-Abdul and Jasiri X. Appropriate for high school students and adults.

DJing Workshop

Saturday, October 24, Noon to 2 pm
$10/person

Explore the world of DJing in this hands-on course, appropriate for teens and adults. Learn the technical and musical skills necessary to become a DJ, including mixing and blending, scratching and beatmaking. Herman Pearl, aka DJ Soy Sos will be instructing. For details, call 412.338.8737 or e-mail swilliamsdevereux@AugustWilsonCenter.org.

One-on-One with Lalah Hathaway

Posted in Events, General on September 10th, 2009 by Shaunda – 3 Comments

Lalah Hathaway

Lalah Hathaway


LISTEN NOW: One-on-One w/Lalah Hathaway

Lalah Hathaway is in the building.

Well, not literally, but she is in Pittsburgh and, from what I hear, is very excited about being the first performer in the August Wilson Center’s Inaugural Season. The energy level has been through the roof here in the Center’s offices…chatter is high on our Twitter, Facebook and MySpace pages–everyone is amp’d about Lalah.

Not that I needed a reason to, but Lalah Hathaway has been on heavy rotation on my iTunes. What is it about Lalah that makes people from various walks of life flock to her like bees to honey? When I told all of my musician and non-musician friends alike that the August Wilson Center was bringing Lalah into Pittsburgh, all of them had the same reaction–and it usually included screaming.

I asked one of my friends in particular, why she had such an appreciation for Lalah. Our conversation:

Me: Hey, I know you bought your ticket for Lalah, why do you like her?

Friend: WHY? WHY? I mean, there are so many answers to that. I mean, it’s not rocket science–she can SING!

Me: That’s it? That’s why you paid $45 to sit two inches from the stage to hear Lalah sing?

Friend: Lalah is set apart from the masses. Her music and sound are soulful, and everybody doesn’t have that. Most people sing just because they have talent. Lalah’s voice comes from a place of authentic soul.

My friend is correct. Lalah’s refreshing tone and vocal acrobatics are simply amazing, impeccably crisp and will leave you jaw-dropped for days. What’s bananas is that Lalah doesn’t even have to do a lot vocally to leave you memorized. I remember when her latest project Self Portrait first came out how my friends and I would listen to it intently, always turning up the volume at the end of every song because every Lalah fan knows that she tends to give us little vocal treats at the end of her songs. Man we wore that CD out. lol. Instrumentation — off the charts. Background singers (in her concerts) — will just have you shaking your head (do a Lalah search on YouTube to see what I mean). Her lyrics reach deep into your heart and connect with every issue in your life.

Lalah is authentic soul. Funny…..remind you of anybody else with the same last name?

PURCHASE TICKETS NOW

Keepin’ it real,

Treshea

P.S. If you all see a woman standing and waving at the concert like that old lady from It’s Showtime at the Apollo—that’s just my friend–she means no harm, she just loves Lalah. Can you blame her?

It’s Official…the August Wilson Center blogs!

Posted in General on September 6th, 2009 by Shaunda – 1 Comment

It’s almost time.

In less than two weeks, the August Wilson Center’s permanent home will officially open to the public. Up until now, the Center’s six seasons of programming has been spread across the Pittsburgh Cultural District’s fine spaces like french fries on a Primanti Brother’s sandwich–but no more.

The August Wilson Center for African American Culture will finally live, operate and exist in its own home at 980 Liberty Avenue, Downtown Pittsburgh. Guess what—you are all invited to see what we are all about!

Now, you can experience the Center in a multitude of ways: You can always physically visit the Center (of course we encourage that), but you can also visit us via our Web site, Facebook, MySpace and Twitter pages.

However….if that’s not enough….(insert drum roll)….the August Wilson Center blogs! This is awesomeness on so many different levels because in THIS realm you will learn about the Center from the voices of various people working behind the scenes to the voices of people performing in the Center’s theater to those installing exhibits in the Center’s gallery spaces and everything in between.

While I will be the primary blogger, a couple of my other friends, who happen to be my colleagues, have agreed to get down and bloggy with me by submitting regular posts. This is magically delicious because we all share the same main goal — Amplifying the Voices of African Americans — but see the world through different spectacles, have varied experiences resulting in contrasting personalities and writing styles. For example, in this realm I tend to be more informal/some would say comedic, and guilty of making up a word or two just because I can (I promised my boss no misspelled words though lol). Sarah on the other hand, a brilliant mind, is very analytical and studious and may use a word or two that will have you searching Dictionary.com every now and then. Maybe that’s why she is the Manager of Education at the Center. The point is: RELAX and enjoy–it’s all done in a great effort to help you stay connected to the Center.

We look forward to being able to rap with you openly in this space. Feel free to hang your coat up and kick off your shoes. Let’s talk intimately about the art, history and culture of people of African descent throughout the world and in Western Pennsylvania and the issues that affect us all.

Real talk. Authentic voices.

So get ready—ain’t no stoppin’ us now!

Keepin’ it real,

Treshea

Treshea Wade - AWC Blogger

Treshea Wade - AWC Blogger